Jatoil report progress towards jatropha oil production

Jatoil’s first shareholder newsletter indicates they are making progress with their plans to become a major jatropha oil producer.

Jatoil’s first major transaction post-IPO was to acquire a controlling interest in PT Biodiesel Austindo. PT Biodiesel Austindo have started planting in Indonesia and should have their first agri-station (small planting that establishes the nursery and oil extraction facilities) by May this year. By the June 2008 PT Biodiesel Austindo anticipate they will have land use agreements for 120,000 hectares.

Jatoil jatropha nursery

Photo: Jatoil shareholder newsletter

Jatoil and Green Energy Vietnam are setting up a joint venture under the Jatoil Group with the aim of establishing 5,000 hectares of jatropha plantations in Vietnam. Jatoil are also looking at similar arrangements across Asia and Sri Lanka.

The high price of palm oil (previous post) is pushing jatropha oil prices up. According to Jatoil the price of crude jatropha oil has increased from USD320 per tonne to USD500 per tonne in the last 30 months. Given biodiesel usage in the US and Europe doesn’t look like decreasing any time soon it appears the future is looking good for Jatoil. All they need to do now is get through the next couple of years until they can start large scale production and hope the market is still good when they get there.

Source: Jatoil Newsletter March 08 (thanks for the tip Sreenivas)

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9 Responses

  1. Brazilian government has push the farmers to produce more raw material for biofuel.
    Jatropa is one of the best because of its production over the years and doesn’t compete with food.

  2. hai, friends i am working as project manager at ghana. i would like to learn on lot about jatropha totally, if int. pl reply .goodday bye

  3. Dear Sir/Madam,

    I have 4,500 hectares of land in the Philippines looking for a business venture for the Planting of Jatropha Curcas. The property is suitable for such plantation. Kindly send email and I will send to you more details of the project.

    Regards,
    Romeo Cruz

  4. I have been communicating with the Western Australian (WA) Government for the past 3 years on establishing trial plantation cultivation of Jatropha. Unfortunately the response I have received from the Minister for Agriculture for WA the Hon Kim Chance has not been encouraging as Jatropha is considered a weed and authority to cultivate has been forbidden at this time. With the urgency in finding alternatives to fossil fuels I have again (June 2008) requested the Department of Agriculture in Western Australia to reconsider its objections to allow the cultivation of Jatropha.
    Australia, in particular Western Australia is well placed to establish a significant bio fuel industry due to the enormous amount of available land, and climatic conditions. Western Australia ‘s is well located to supply Europe and Asia markets eager to trade in what is going to be a significant commodity in the years to come.

    Roy Phillips
    Carramar
    Western Australia

    roymoss2007@hotmail.com

  5. Roy,

    I have posted this elsewhere on this site but your comments require a direct response:

    I am concerned that the invasive weed industry – the trendy “scientific” field to be in and therefore the one that attracts government funding – is painting a very black picture of Jatropha as an oil crop. I worked with the plant as an erosion control measure on extremely poor soils in Burma many years ago and found it to be very benign. The scaremongers refer to its toxicity with cattle as being a problem.
    In Burma it is the universal hedge to control cattle movement, and I didn’t see dead cattle littering the fields – and those animals were hungry! I also didn’t hear of children dying from physic nut poisoning either. It is a lot less lethal than the vehicles its oil may power…

    I have worked with another erosion control plant that the same Invasive Plant “experts” have labeled as being “invasive”. I have either used or studied that plant in 14 countries over the last 19 years and have never seen it being invasive. It is simply NOT invasive – so one can see just how much credibility these so called experts on invasive plants have. Unfortunately the politicians rely on their assessments and make poor decisions accordingly. The agricultural industry in Australia will be the loser while the paid specialists will still be paid and will not be held accountable for the issues they have created.

    Note that I majored in plant science/ecology and have 40 years field experience.

    Regards
    Don

  6. Roy,

    I have posted this elsewhere on this site but your comments require a direct response:

    I am concerned that the invasive weed industry – the trendy “scientific” field to be in and therefore the one that attracts government funding – is painting a very black picture of Jatropha as an oil crop. I worked with the plant as an erosion control measure on extremely poor soils in Burma many years ago and found it to be very benign.

    The scaremongers refer to its toxicity with cattle as being a problem. In Burma it is the universal hedge to control cattle movement, and I didn’t see dead cattle littering the fields – and those animals were hungry! I also didn’t hear of children dying from physic nut poisoning either. It is a lot less lethal than the vehicles its oil may power…

    I have worked with another erosion control plant that the same Invasive Plant “experts” have labeled as being “invasive”. I have either used or studied that plant in 14 countries over the last 19 years and have never seen it being invasive. It is simply NOT invasive – so one can see just how much credibility these so called experts on invasive plants have. Unfortunately the politicians rely on their assessments and make poor decisions accordingly.

    The agricultural industry in Australia will be the loser while the paid specialists will still be paid and will not be held accountable for the issues they have created.

    Note that I majored in plant science/ecology and have 40 years field experience.

    Regards
    Don

  7. We are testing Jatropha now for over one year under irrigated and non irrigated circumstances in the Northeast of Brazil. Our results are poor. The plant doesn’t perform as predicted. We still put our focus on uneatable castor bean as feedstock for biodiesel.

  8. I am interested in the Jatropha plants. i will like to know how many quantities you can provide per year and the cost. in U.S dollars.

  9. Estoy interesado en recibir información de cultivos para producir BIODIESEL.
    Gracias

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