Biomethane recognised in European Parliament

The International Association of Natural Gas Vehicles is trumpeting the success of the Morgan Report in highlighting

the future that gaseous fuels, specifically natural gas and biomethane, should have in meeting future transportation fuel requirements in Europe

to the European Parliament. See Natural Gas Vehicles and Renewable Biomethane Finally on European Agenda for the full article.

If anyone knows of similar activities the Australian Government is undertaking to ensure our future transportation fuel requirements will be met please let us know. Hmmmm, is that silence I hear?

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2 Responses

  1. I Googled Natural gas Bio gas after reading of the work done in Queensland on banana waste producing copious quantities of Natural gas. Blending it in to the already active natural gas system should be obvious, Forget this disappointing Government, what is AGL doing? there is nothing about it on their website, yet they are the ones who are best placed to act

  2. I got an answer to my question by exploring further on the Beginner’s guide to Biogas http://www.adelaide.edu.au/biogas/, where it is claimed that Biogas does not compress as well as the Natural gas used in cars and could be dangerous in this application. They write that biogas is best used immediately to generate power nearby. As to farm equipment, why not generate electricity using Biogas instead of the diesel farmers currently use and power farm equiment using electric motors. If there comes a market for farm equipment powered turbine/electric or any other way then we should find it happening. Perhaps Carbon Trading will generate the necessary economic incentive.
    It seems to me that we are all waiting for the future fuel to sort itself out. The GMH website says they expect hydrogen to be the best fuel for the future. Of course that would mean junking the entire car fleet of the world and we’d have to buy the new ones. What a mess! What happened to the algae that was supposed to produce oil that is suitable to slot into the existing fuel cycle? Such a fuel would prevent a lot of waste. All reference to it has disappeared from the web. I read about it about 5 years ago in the MIT online magazine.
    Why does the NRMA have no apparent interest in these questions? The ramifications for motorists are immense.

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